Stonehenge-nieuws

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Stonehenge-nieuws

Bericht  Sibbevader op wo 10 jun 2009, 20:22

A prehistoric complex, including two 6,000-year-old tombs, has been discovered by archaeologists in Hampshire.

The Neolithic tombs, which until now had gone unnoticed under farmland despite being just 15 miles from Stonehenge, are some of the oldest monuments to have been found in Britain.

Archaeologists say they will hold valuable clues about how people lived at the time and what their environment was like.

The discovery is also close to Cranborne Chase, one of the most well researched prehistoric areas in Europe.

“It’s one of the most famous prehistoric landscapes, a Mecca for prehistorians, and you would have thought the archaeological world would have gone over it with a fine tooth comb,” Dr Helen Wickstead, the Kingston University archaeologist leading the project, said.

From examining similar sites, archaeologists know that complex burial rituals were common at the time. Typically bodies would be left in the open air until the flesh had decayed, leaving only a skeleton. Then bones were put in special arrangements in the tombs.

“The tombs were like bone homes for important people in the community,” Dr Wickstead said.

The tombs were discovered by Damian Grady, an English Heritage photographer, who flew over the area in a light aircraft taking aerial photographs of the land, looking for marks or features on the landscape suggestive of ancient monuments. One photograph showed two long mounds.

After discussions with colleagues, Mr Grady was left in little doubt that the mounds were the site of ancient tombs. He contacted Dr Wickstead inviting her to investigate.

After carrying out a survey of the land using electromagnetic detectors and ultrasound, Dr Wickstead created a map of what lay beneath the fields. She was able to identify the two tombs with troughs on each side, known as long barrows, typical of Neolithic burial sites.

Her team was also found artefacts, including fragments of pottery, flint and stone tools, close to the surface.

So far Dr Wickstead’s team have only used non-invasive techniques to figure out what lies inside the tombs, which are located on the land of a local female farmer.

Because the original surface of the land has been preserved beneath the mound, scientists will be able to examine it for traces of pollen and identify which plants and trees were common at the time.

Whether they are excavated will depend on local feeling, she says.

“We’re treading very carefully on the excavation issue,” Dr Wickstead said.

“We want to be sure that it’s what people living in Damerham village want. It’s their heritage.”

The Kingston University team are due to publish preliminary findings of their research in the journal Hampshire Studies.

Times Online

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Als wachter over recht en wet stelt men de boom aan de grens van de gemeente; hij moet als een vertegenwoordiger van de hoogste rechter, het veld behoeden en de boosdoeners tegenhouden. Daarom bestraft men de boomschender als een rover of moordenaar: wie de kruin van een groene boom afslaat, zal op zijn stam het hoofd afgeslagen worden, en wie zijn wortels schendt, zal het zijn eigen voeten ervoor boeten.

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Re: Stonehenge-nieuws

Bericht  Sibbevader op di 29 dec 2009, 09:31

Stonehenge bones may be evidence of winter solstice feasts


Stonehenge was begun more than 5,000 years ago and developed over 1,000 years.

Some 4,500 years ago, as the solstice sun rose on Stonehenge, it is very likely that a midwinter feast would already have been roasting on the cooking fires.

Experts believe that huge midwinter feasts were held in that period at the site and a startling picture is now emerging of just how far cattle were moved for the banquet. Recent analysis of the cattle and pig bones from the era found in the area suggests the cattle used were walked hundreds of miles to be slaughtered for the solstice celebrations – from the west country or west Wales.

Professor Mike Parker Pearson of the University of Sheffield and his team have just won a grant of £800,000 from the Arts and Humanities Research Council, to answer some of the riddles about the enigmatic prehistoric monument.

The grant is to fund Feeding Stonehenge, his follow-up research on the wealth of material, including animal bones, pottery and plant remains, which they found in recent excavations at Durrington Walls, a few miles from the stone circle – a site which Parker Pearson believes key to understanding why Stonehenge was built and how it was used.

His team fully excavated some huts but located the foundations of scores more, the largest neolothic settlement in Britain. To his joy it was a prehistoric tip, "the filthiest site known in Britain", as he dubbed it.

"I've always thought when we admire monuments like Stonehenge, not enough attention has been given to who made the sandwiches and the cups of tea for the builders," said Parker Pearson.

"The logistics of the operation were extraordinary. Not just food for hundreds of people but antler picks, hide ropes, all the infrastructure needed to supply the materials and supplies needed. Where did they get all this food from? This is what we hope to discover."

Stonehenge was begun almost 5,000 years ago with a ditch and earth bank, and developed over 1,000 years, with the circle of bluestones brought from the Preseli hills in west Wales, and the double decker bus sized sarsen stones.

It was too early for the Phoenicians, the Romans or the largely mythical Celtic druids. The Anglo Saxons believed Stonehenge was the work of a race of lost giants, and a 12th-century historian explained that Merlin flew the huge stones from Ireland.

It has been explained as a place of druidic sacrifice, a stone computer, a place of witchcraft and magic, a tomb, a temple or a solar calendar. It is aligned on both the summer and winter solstice, crucial dates which told prehistoric farmers that the time of harvest was coming, or the shortest day of winter past.

Although not all archaeologists agree – Geoff Wainwright and Tim Darvill have dubbed Stonehenge the stone age Lourdes, a place of healing by the magic bluestones – Parker Pearson believes it was a place of the dead, while Durrington Walls, with its wooden henge, was the place of its living builders, and the generations who came to feast, and carry out rituals for their dead, moving from Durrington to the nearby river and on by the great processional avenue to Stonehenge.

He found no evidence that Durrington was permanently inhabited or farmed, and the first tests on the pig and cattle bones support his theory that it was a place where people gathered for short periods on special occasions.

The pigs were evidently slaughtered at mid-winter, and he expects the cattle bones to back this. What the sample already tested shows is that they were slaughtered immediately after arrival, after travelling immense distances.

"We are going to know so much about the lives of the people who built Stonehenge," Parker Pearson said, "how they lived, what they ate, where they came from."

The Guardian

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Als wachter over recht en wet stelt men de boom aan de grens van de gemeente; hij moet als een vertegenwoordiger van de hoogste rechter, het veld behoeden en de boosdoeners tegenhouden. Daarom bestraft men de boomschender als een rover of moordenaar: wie de kruin van een groene boom afslaat, zal op zijn stam het hoofd afgeslagen worden, en wie zijn wortels schendt, zal het zijn eigen voeten ervoor boeten.

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Re: Stonehenge-nieuws

Bericht  Sibbevader op di 16 feb 2010, 11:15

Society supports road closures at Stonehenge
The Society supports the road clsure proposed by Wiltshire Council at Stonehenge and has written to Wiltshire Council.

The Consultation is open until 15 February - full details and an online form are on the Wiltshire Council website.

The Wiltshire Archaeological and Natural History Society supports without reservation the proposed Traffic Regulation Order (TRO) prohibiting motorised vehicles, with exceptions, on part of the A344 and the Byways within the Stonehenge World Heritage Site.

The inscription in 1986 by UNESCO of the Stonehenge and Avebury World Heritage Site indicated the necessity of closing the A344 by Stonehenge as an urgent consideration , and this has continued to be a just concern of the World Heritage Committee . The closure to motorised vehicles of the A344 is the crucial, necessary, enhancement of the immediate environment of the Stonehenge monument to re-join it to the Avenue, and, equally important, to eliminate the impact of motorised vehicles on the monuments and landscape in the central region of the World Heritage Site through which the A344 currently runs.

The equally imperative permanent TRO on the Byways within the Stonehenge World Heritage Site will not only enhance people’s appreciation of the World Heritage Site through the removal of the distraction of both moving and parked vehicles, but also minimise the ongoing damage to the archaeological remains, both scheduled monuments (e.g. SM 10317 and 10327) and the remains of other features which survive within the unploughed margins of the Byways, where current motorised vehicles have increasingly widened the traffic-worn and rutted tracks.

The Society encourages, for the same reasons and as a matter of parity, the Council to propose as soon as possible the permanent prohibition too of motorised vehicles on Byways in the Avebury part of the Stonehenge and Avebury World Heritage Site.

Wilthshire Heritage

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Als wachter over recht en wet stelt men de boom aan de grens van de gemeente; hij moet als een vertegenwoordiger van de hoogste rechter, het veld behoeden en de boosdoeners tegenhouden. Daarom bestraft men de boomschender als een rover of moordenaar: wie de kruin van een groene boom afslaat, zal op zijn stam het hoofd afgeslagen worden, en wie zijn wortels schendt, zal het zijn eigen voeten ervoor boeten.

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Re: Stonehenge-nieuws

Bericht  Sibbevader op di 16 feb 2010, 11:28

Stonehenge "Hedge" Found, Shielded Secret Rituals?


Stonehenge may have been surrounded by a "Stonehedge" that blocked onlookers from seeing secret rituals, according to a new study.

Evidence for two encircling hedges—possibly thorn bushes—planted some 3,600 years ago was uncovered during a survey of the site by English Heritage, the government agency responsible for maintaining the monument in southern England.

The idea that Stonehedge was a shield against prying eyes isn’t yet firmly rooted, but it's archaeologists' leading theory. For instance the newfound banks are too low and unsubstantial to have had a defensive role.

"The best [theory] we can come up with is some sort of hedge bank," said English Heritage archaeologist David Field, whose team discovered the two landscape features in Grasmaand (apr.) 2009.

"We think they served as some sort of screen to filter access to the center [of Stonehenge]." (See Stonehenge pictures.)

The shallow earthworks—each runs inside a ring of known Bronze Age pits—are just visible to an expert eye, "but you need to get down on your hands and knees" to see them, Field added.

The archaeologists didn't find any physical evidence of vegetation, but the shallow features resemble former hedge banks that are seen around formerly hedged fields.

Early Gardeners?

While there’s no firm evidence for a British prehistoric landscape-gardening tradition, there's evidence for tree cultivation at the time Stonehenge was in use.

"It seems standard-size trees were being cultivated and looked after in order to provide straight, telegraph-pole-like features for the construction of palisades [fences of defensive stakes] and so on," Field said.

With that in mind, Stonehedge's "vegetation screens are quite feasible," Field said. "Something like thorn bushes … or small trees."

Past archaeological investigations at Stonehenge have tended to focus chiefly on the stones themselves, he noted.

"To date nobody has really considered the vegetation around the stones."

(Related: "Mini-Stonehenge Found: Crematorium on Stonehenge Road?")

The latest finds, reported in the March/April edition of British Archaeology magazine, come "completely out of the blue," according to editor Mike Pitts, an archaeologist and Stonehenge expert.

The magazine, a publication of the Council for British Archaeology, often publishes archaeologist-written reports on new finds.

While Pitts thinks the hedge theory is "a perfectly reasonable explanation … there have been no excavations of these features, so until that happens we won’t really know what’s going on."

Mystery Mound

The Grasmaand (apr.) 2009 landscape survey employed advanced equipment, such as high-resolution surface lasers, to discern shapes invisible to the human eye.

"Believe it or not, it's the first earthworks survey of the monument since 1919," Pitts added. "Unsurprisingly, all sorts of things were found."

Those include a flattened mound near the center of Stonehenge, which may be a burial. The Stonehenge area is littered with prehistoric burial mounds, and the monument itself likely served first and foremost as a cemetery, experts say.

Partially concealed by fallen stones, the forgotten mound had been previously recorded in 18th- and 19th-century watercolor paintings.

"There’s a good chance it's prehistoric," said English Heritage's Field.

The suspected burial mound possibly dates to the earliest phases of the monument, as early as 5,000 years ago, Field said.

If the mound was built first, "it may be that this was the focus around which Stonehenge developed."

National Geographic

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Als wachter over recht en wet stelt men de boom aan de grens van de gemeente; hij moet als een vertegenwoordiger van de hoogste rechter, het veld behoeden en de boosdoeners tegenhouden. Daarom bestraft men de boomschender als een rover of moordenaar: wie de kruin van een groene boom afslaat, zal op zijn stam het hoofd afgeslagen worden, en wie zijn wortels schendt, zal het zijn eigen voeten ervoor boeten.

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Re: Stonehenge-nieuws

Bericht  Sibbevader op za 17 apr 2010, 09:52


Pre-Stonehenge Megaliths Linked to Death Rituals
Nine recently discovered stone monuments in England predate Stonehenge but share similar construction and alignment with the famous megaliths.

The recent finding of nine megaliths in Dartmoor, England suggest that monuments of Stonehenge played a key role in rituals, particularly related to death.
Morguefile

THE GIST:

* Nine megaliths in England share similar construction and alignment with Stonehenge.
* These monuments all mark the rising of the midsummer sun and the setting of midwinter sun.
* Burials and food remains found nearby suggest death-related rituals may have been held at the standing stones.



Nine megaliths in a remote part of Dartmoor, England, share features in common with Stonehenge, and may shed light on the meaning behind these prehistoric stone monuments, according to a report in the latest issue of British Archaeology.

The Dartmoor megaliths, which were recently carbon-dated to around 3500 B.C., could predate Stonehenge, but both sites feature large standing stones that are aligned to mark the rising of the midsummer sun and the setting of the midwinter sun. Yet another Dartmoor stone monument, called Drizzlecombe, shares the same orientation.

The ancient Brits were not necessarily sun worshippers, however.

Archaeologist Mike Pitts, editor of the journal, told Discovery News that "huge quantities of barbecued juvenile pig bones" were found near Stonehenge, indicating that the animals were born in the spring and killed not far from the site "for pork feasting" in midwinter.
weather
WATCH VIDEO: For centuries the dawn has shed its light on the megalithic ruin known as Stonehenge.

"The general feeling is that the sun was symbolizing or marking the occasion, rather than being the ritual focus itself, so it probably was not sun worship," added Pitts, who is author of the book "Hengeworld" and is one of the leading experts on British megaliths.

This feasting was not just a meaningless pork party, and might have been more akin to a post-funeral wake today.

Pitts believes the "solstice alignment phenomenon perhaps has something to do with death."

As he explains the setting sun and shorter days of winter would have represented the passage into the darkness of the underworld, and the reverse as the days start to lengthen again.

"At Stonehenge," he continued, "the dark navy-colored bluestones may themselves represent ancestors or spirits from the underworld, while the big orangey-pink (before weathering) sarsens could reflect summer and light."

The Dartmoor megaliths, described in a separate study in the current issue of the journal Antiquity, are now lying flat, since the stones in a row fell, or were individually pushed, over. The toppling was fortuitous for historians, however, since peat above and the below the stones permitted the carbon dating, which is extremely rare for such monuments.

Tom Greeves, who discovered the Dartmoor stones at a site called Cut Hill and is co-author of the Antiquity paper, said it is "remarkable that a previously unrecorded stone row with very large stones has been noted for the first time on one of Dartmoor's highest and remotest hills."

He added that to reach their location "requires a walk of about two hours from whatever direction."

A ditched barrow (a mound of earth or stones) exists very close to the Cut Hill stones, providing further evidence that burials and possible death-related rituals might have taken place there.

At least 81 stone monuments have now been discovered nearby, with Cut Hill's being among the largest at over 705 feet in length. Both Greeves and Pitts said it's possible some of the monuments served different functions, such as marking land use zones. The barrows, shared alignment, and other finds, however, indicate several standing stone monuments held ritualistic meaning.

Pitts likened their construction to the building of cathedrals and pyramids, and to the carving of the giant heads on Easter Island.

All, he said, are involved in the "defining of ritual spaces, giving ceremony and power distinctive physical presences, engaging large numbers by employing them in the construction processes, ceremonializing places beyond the mere moment of the rituals."

Pitts hopes that in the near future, archaeologists will carefully place the Cut Hill stones back into their upright positions, to further reveal what the monument looked like when it was first erected.

Discovery News

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Als wachter over recht en wet stelt men de boom aan de grens van de gemeente; hij moet als een vertegenwoordiger van de hoogste rechter, het veld behoeden en de boosdoeners tegenhouden. Daarom bestraft men de boomschender als een rover of moordenaar: wie de kruin van een groene boom afslaat, zal op zijn stam het hoofd afgeslagen worden, en wie zijn wortels schendt, zal het zijn eigen voeten ervoor boeten.

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Houten versie van Stonehenge ontdekt

Bericht  ossaert op do 22 jul 2010, 18:34

HOUTEN VERSIE VAN STONEHENGE ONTDEKT

In Groot-Brittannië hebben archeologen
op een kilometer van het monument
Stonehenge een constructie ontdekt die
opvallend veel gelijkt op de bekende
prehistorische site.

Het gaat om een grote kring omringd
door een gracht en waarin zich grote
putten bevinden die ongeveer een meter
breed zijn Wetenschappers van de
universiteit van Birmingham denken dat
ooit grote houten palen in de putten
zaten.

"Dit is een zeer opmerkelijke vondst.
Het verandert hoe we denken over
Stonehenge. Het is de belangrijkste
ontdekking in een generatie", zegt
professor Vince Gaffney.
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Re: Stonehenge-nieuws

Bericht  Sibbevader op do 22 jul 2010, 21:03

Inderdaad:


Ancient wooden version of Stonehenge found on Salisbury Plain

An ancient wooden version of Stonehenge has been unearthed at the site of the
world famous Bronze Age monument in Wiltshire.


The sun rises behind Stonehenge

The discovery of the timber henge just metres from its giant stone double has
been hailed as the most exciting find the site in 50 years.

Archaeologists conducting a multi-million pound study unearthed a circular
ditch surrounding a smaller circle of deep pits about a metre wide, which
are thought to have once been filled by timber posts.

The new henge, which means a circular monument dating back to the Neolithic
and Bronze ages, was found just 900 metres (2,950ft) from the stone
circle on Salisbury Plain
.

Archaeologists believe it was constructed at the same time as Stonehenge was
being completed – around 4,500 years ago.

The timber ring has two entrances on the north-east and south-west sides and
surrounds an ancient burial mound, which is thought to have appeared much
later.

Data from the site is being collected in order to build a virtual picture of
what the area looked like at the time Stonehenge was built.

Opinion is divided as to why the ancient landmark was constructed, but many
experts believe it was a used
as a cemetery
for the first 500 years.

A British academic claimed
last year
that the site had been used as a dance arena for listening
to "trance-style" music.

Professor Vince Gaffney, the archaeologist from the University of Birmingham
who is leading the dig, said he was “certain” that further discoveries would
be made as 90 per cent of the land around Stonehenge has never been
excavated.

"The presumption was this was just an empty field - now you've got a
major ceremonial monument looking at Stonehenge," he said.

"This is probably the first major ceremonial monument that has been found
in the past 50 years or so.

"This is really quite interesting and exceptional, it starts to give us a
different perspective of the landscape."

The excavation is being funded by the Ludwig Boltzmann Institute for
Archaeological Prospection and Virtual Archaeology, in Vienna, and the
University of Birmingham, and is assisted by the National Trust and English
Heritage.

Thousands of druids and sun worshipers gathered at Stonehenge to watch
dawn break on the Summer Solstice
last month.



Telegraph

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Re: Stonehenge-nieuws

Bericht  Sibbevader op do 25 nov 2010, 10:13

Stonehenge visitor centre backed by £10m from lottery
Stonehenge The centre would be linked to the historic stones by a transit system

Plans for a new £27m visitor centre at Stonehenge in Wiltshire have been given a boost by a £10m grant from the Heritage Lottery Fund (HLF).

In June the project's future was put in doubt after the coalition government axed £10m of funding.

The HLF is now providing more than twice as much funding as it had initially earmarked towards the scheme.

English Heritage said the cash narrowed the funding gap but it still had to find about a third of the cost.

The proposed centre would consist of a pair of single-storey areas of glass and timber about a mile-and-a-half (2.4km) west of the prehistoric stones.

The visitor centre's facilities would include exhibition and education facilities, a cafe, shop and toilets.
'Message of confidence'

A transit system would transport visitors to the World Heritage Site.

The proposals also include plans to close the A344 which currently runs next to the stones.

Baroness Andrews, chair of English Heritage, said: "We are tremendously grateful for this generous grant.

"Not only does it help to narrow the funding gap for the project considerably, it also sends out a message of confidence about the transformational benefits that the project will bring - to tourism, local economy and the conservation and public enjoyment of Stonehenge and its landscape."

Efforts to improve the site's facilities have hit several problems in the past.

The current scheme, which had been given the "go-ahead in principle" by ministers, is the latest in a long line of proposals.
'Iconic site'

In 2000 two projects were planned - to remove roads from around Stonehenge by placing the nearby A303 in a tunnel and to relocate visitor facilities to a new centre away from the stones.

The government pulled the plug on those proposals in 2007, saying the estimated £500m costs of the tunnel were too high.

Wiltshire Council Leader Jane Scott said it was a boost for Wiltshire's tourist industry and economy at a time when spending cuts were in the headlines.

"We will be working with English Heritage to make Stonehenge an even greater experience for the thousands of visitors who come into our county to see what is undoubtedly one of the most iconic sites in the world," she added.

Stonehenge, constructed between 3,000 BC and 1,600 BC, and thought to have been used for a variety of religious ceremonies, attracts around 900,000 visitors a year, 70% of whom come from abroad.

BBC

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Re: Stonehenge-nieuws

Bericht  Grendel op wo 29 dec 2010, 10:09


Druids at Stonehenge solstice event

Snow and ice failed to keep people away from Stonehenge as they gathered to see the sun rise on the winter solstice.

More than 2,000 people came together at the stones, which were surrounded by a thick blanket of snow.

The winter morning mist obscured the actual sunrise - which took place at 8.09am on Wednesday - but an eclectic mix of people celebrated the ancient festival.

Among the Druids, hippies and sun worshippers were those just curious to experience the spiritual event at the site, on Salisbury Plain, in Wiltshire.

Serving soldier of 15 years Lance Corporal Paul Thomas, who fought in Iraq, was "knighted" with a sword by Druid protester King Arthur Pendragon.

Formerly known as John Rothwell, King Arthur changed his name by deed poll.

He also performed a handfasting - a Pagan marriage ceremony - inside the stones.



As well as the traditional Druid and Pagan ceremonies, a spontaneous snowball fight erupted as people enjoyed the cold weather.

The shortest day of the year often falls on Wintermaand (dec.) 21, but this year the Druid and Pagan community marked the first day of winter today because the modern calendar of 365 days a year - with an extra day every four years - does not correspond exactly to the solar year of 365.2422 days.

During the winter solstice the sun is closer to the horizon than at any other time in the year, meaning shorter days and longer nights. The day after the winter solstice marks the beginning of lengthening days, leading up to the summer solstice in June.

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Re: Stonehenge-nieuws

Bericht  ossaert op wo 29 dec 2010, 11:13

Oh man, 't wordt tijd om die onnozelaars eens hard aan te pakken....

De Groet
Jan
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Re: Stonehenge-nieuws

Bericht  ossaert op ma 05 dec 2011, 08:53

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Stonehenge en akoestiek

Bericht  ossaert op za 18 feb 2012, 15:24

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Re: Stonehenge-nieuws

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